Revista Română de Studii Eurasiatice, Anul XVIII, Nr. 1-2 / 2022

Accepted Papers

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Timo Schmitz (Germany), Analysing the systematisation of Juche and its output

 

Iulia Monica Oehler-Şincai (Institute for World Economy of the Romanian Academy, Bucharest, Romania)- Book review: Professor Anna Eva Budura, Seventy Springs and Autumns with China, Top Form Publishing House, Bucharest, 2021, 362 pages

 

Laura Sînziana Cuciuc Romanescu (Ovidius University of Constanta, Romania), Ozlem Kaya (Uşak University, Turkey), The Ashmole Bestiary - Symbols and Colors on Fantastic Zoomorphe Representations

 

Kyu-hyun Jo (Yonsei University, Korea), An Examination of Britain's Geopolitical Considerations Concerning the Post-World War II Peace Treaty with Japan

 

Pradeep N’ Weerasinghe (University of Colombo, Sri Lanka), Framing Television News: Projection of interreligious tensions in Sri Lanka

 

Theodora Flaut (Doctoral School of Humanities, Ovidius University of Constanta, Romania), An Overview of Specialised Language Research from a Multidisciplinary Perspective

 

Shawn McAvoy (Patrick & Henry Community College, Martinsville VA, USA), “To Enlarge the Peaceful Influence of American Ideals”: The Grant Administration’s Optimism vis-à-vis German Unification in 1871

 

Theodora Flaut (Doctoral School of Humanities, Ovidius University of Constanta, Romania) -Book review: Armanda-Ramona Stroia, Clişeul lingvistic în mass media românească actuală, Editura MEGA, Cluj-Napoca, 2021, 430 p. 

 


Dmytro Bondarenko (Department of Contemporary History, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary), Geopolitics of Central and Eastern Europe and World War I



Jason Morgan (Reitaku University in Kashiwa, Japan), Book review: Marie Favereau, The Horde: How the Mongols Changed the World. Cambridge, MA: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press. 2021. 377 pages. ISBN 9780674244214. Hardcover, $29.95.



Nechita Runcan (“Ovidius” University of Constanța), The Ecumenical Personality of Some Holy Fathers and Patristic Writers From the Danubean and West Pontic Area